Pitti Uomo100 for Spring/Summer 2022 optimistically staged a face-to-face event at the Fortezza da Basso in Florence, 30th June to 2nd July, after two previous solely digital editions. It attracted 4000 buyers, 25% international, and over 700 journalists. There were 396 exhibitors, 57 exclusively on Pitti Connect Digital.

Several weeks later, the presence of the exhibitors was still online, with Pitti Connect still live with official spotlights on social media picking out brands on Instagram and Facebook.

Sustainability is paramount at this quality level, and inventive designers and street fashion use classics in a new way. Customers expect both standards and a believable responsible story.

Looks were easy, bigger, and relaxed, and showed a very eclectic look, mingling streetwear, sports looks and classic menswear for young and old.

New asymmetrical coloured Summer V necks. © BIkkembergs
New asymmetrical coloured Summer V necks. © BIkkembergs

In particular, young designers made clothes for movement; skateboards, cycling and just moving and walking more after successive lockdowns. Designs were optimistic, mixing patterns, florals, geometrics, and large graffiti-like prints in the process using a lot of knitted fabrics and knitwear.

The suit remains a runner, often with a different presentation, lighter fabrics, less matching. A comment made on Pitti Connect noted ties at the fair were much rarer. “Instead, tailoring is now being accompanied by knitted polos, t-shirts and more relaxed shirts,” citing Filippo de Laurentiis for its SS22-collection featuring a variety of knitwear with ‘60s Riviera flair’.

Knitwear was often the most interesting part of the designer look. Fashion after lockdown is more colourful, less matching.  Among tailoring brands at the fair, reliable provenance emphasises traditional Italian luxury like cashmere knitwear, leather, and extra-fine wool. at Brunello Cuccinelli, showing the continuing appeal of classic qualities.

Many styles are mixed. Knits with collars and high necks are billed as designed to wear with jackets as there are fewer collar and tie looks. Reimagined classics include British cricket style V-neck cable jumpers in Merino wool or cotton appear in many collections, from trad white with a coloured. V, to navy with red and other colours.

Tombolini presented a new Zero Gravity-collection, blazers, and suits in ultra-light jerseys.  Bikkembergs online included sweaters and jackets with intarsia and geometric patterns, creating an interesting fantasy team look with athletic inspired garment details.

Fabrics were in the main natural fibres and luxury blends, using linen, cashmere, Merino, and other lightweight wools, as well as eco-conscious man-made fibres, like Asahi Kasei Bemberg/ Cupro. Stylish young knitwear by Avant Toi produced and distributed by Liapull in Italy, used luxury stalwarts’ mohair, wool, cashmere, and silk.

Colours veered between natural and undyed shades and bright sporty colours, mixing unexpected elements like floral shirts, summer knits, T shirts with arty abstracts with knitted jackets.

Multi-cultural images formed a lively theme throughout. Cool British style, long appreciated in Europe, Ben Sherman or Baracuta, used iconic designs mixing activewear and streetwear; the way items are put together transform the look.

Memorable looks came from Pitti Uomo’s guest designer this year, young South African Thebe Magugu, making waves in international fashion. He reimagined cowboy images, whole outfits in bright colours like red or blue, Stetsons and eye masks, bringing a new imagination to the cinematic wild west.

Finnish designer Rolf Ekroth co-operated with a fibre project from Energy company Fortum using discarded straw harvest matter called Bio2. His collection, inspired by the Midsummer in Finland, was a strong bid for the important ecological limelight.

https://uomo.pittimmagine.com/en